Romantic literature


In literature, Romanticism found recurrent themes in the evocation or criticism of the past, the cult of "sensibility" with its emphasis on women and children, the heroic isolation of the artist or narrator, and respect for a new, wilder, untrammeled and "pure" nature. Furthermore, several romantic authors, such as Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, based their writings on the supernatural/occult and human psychology. Romanticism also helped in the emergence of new ideas and in the process led to the emergence of positive voices that were beneficial for the marginalized sections of the society.

The roots of romanticism in poetry go back to the time of Alexander Pope (1688–1744).[25[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanticism#cite_note-John_Keats_page_106-24|]]] Early pioneers include Joseph Warton (headmaster at Winchester College) and his brother Thomas Warton, professor of Poetry at Oxford University.[25[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanticism#cite_note-John_Keats_page_106-24|]]] Joseph maintained that invention and imagination were the chief qualities of a poet. The "poet's poet" Thomas Chatterton is generally considered to be the first Romantic poet in English.[26[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanticism#cite_note-Thomas_Chatterton_1972.2C_page_11-25|]]] The Scottish poet James Macpherson influenced the early development of Romanticism with the international success of his Ossian cycle of poems published in 1762, inspiring both Goethe and the young Walter Scott.(NG)
external image Thomas_Chatterton.jpg
sources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanticism